Valleys of Life
Valleys of Life
Life, Death, and the Wisdom in Between
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Death – it’s an uncomfortable reality that we all must face at some point. In our latest podcast episode of Valleys of Life, we journey into the inevitability of our mortality. This exploration is not just a philosophical musing about death; it’s grounded in hard facts and wisdom from the book of Ecclesiastes.

The exploration begins with the unraveling of an ancient fable of a merchant’s servant and his eerie encounter with death. This encounter underscores the inescapability of our appointment with death. Hebrews 9:27 reminds us that it is appointed unto man to die – an unavoidable meeting that has been scheduled for each one of us.

This episode also shines a light on the stark reality of mortality rates worldwide. Drawing from America’s Kennedy Institute of Bioethics Research Library, we learn that 65 million people die each year in the world. This equates to 180,000 people dying each day, or 120 people every minute. These statistics serve as a sobering reminder of our own mortality.

However, the purpose of this exploration is not to induce fear, but rather to inspire us to live with purpose and wisdom. Ecclesiastes 7:2 advises us that it’s better to go to the house of mourning than to go to the house of feasting, for death is the destiny of everyone, and the living should take it to heart.

By broaching the certainty of death, we can begin to reflect on how we live our lives. The inevitability of death should move us to live with intentionality and wisdom, to consider the brevity of life, and to contemplate the eternity of God who rules both life and death. As the Gospel encourages us, we should put our faith in the Lord Jesus Christ if we want to live forever.

This contemplation on death also underscores the importance of praying for wisdom and applying our hearts to wisdom. As Moses prayed in Psalm 90:12, we too should request the Lord to teach us to number our days, to remind us of the fleeting nature of life and the significance of our actions in the here and now.

In conclusion, confronting our mortality is an essential exercise. Not only does it help us come to terms with the inevitability of death, but it also inspires us to live purposefully and wisely. Death may be an uncomfortable reality, but it’s also a potent catalyst for transformation, for living with purpose, and for finding wisdom.

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ByJustus Musinguzi

You may not know what the future holds, but if you know the God who holds the future, then that's enough. It is better to walk in the darkness with this God, than to walk in the light alone. It is better to remain in the desolate wilderness and walk in the valleys with God than to go to the magnificent promised and be on the pinacles of glory without him. The future is as bright as the promises of God! Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God.

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